Aquinas cosmological argument essay

Bang aquinas cosmological argument essay of the creation of the universe. God to have created it that way. Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

In this paper I will be exploring two arguments on the topic of the existence of God. In particular, I will focus on Saint Thomas Aquinas’s efficient causation argument for God’s existence and an objection to it from Bertrand Russell. After an analysis of Aquinas’s argument and a presentation of Russell’s objection, I will show how Russell’s objection fails. Aquinas says there are five ways to prove that God exists and one of them is through efficient causation. He starts with the premise that every effect we observe must have been caused by something else.

Among the three arguments to prove God’s existence, I find Aquinas’s cosmological argument well-grounded in empirical evidence, and that the focus on simple facts proves acceptable in both historical and scientific dimensions. Aquinas starts by stating the preliminary matter that God’s existence is not self-evident, and therefore we need to examine God’s effects, which we are able to observe, to prove God’s existence, although we are not able to understand God’s nature perfectly. Aquinas provides five ways demonstrate the existence of a transcendent being through empirical evidence. For Saint Thomas Aquinas, his passion involved the scientific reasoning of God. The existence, simplicity and will of God are simply a few topics which Aquinas explores in the Summa Theologica.

Through arguments entailing these particular topics, Aquinas forms an argument that God has the ability of knowing and willing this particular world of contingent beings. In the article of Existence of God, the article describes the distinction between existence and essence on weather or not God exists or ever existed. The argument resembles more on cosmological arguments of Thomas Aquinas, then the ontological argument of Anselm. The argument persuades the existence of God can be separated from the essence of God, but the argument goes on to argue if God exists or never existed. The argument clearly states that God exists by giving examples, such mountains and valleys, which cannot in anyway be separated from the other.

With the help of a somewhat weak modal logic, however, the Third Way can be transformed into a argument which is certainly valid and plausibly sound. Much of what Aquinas asserted in the Third Way is possibly true even if it is not actually true. Instead of assuming, for example, that things which are contingent fail to exist at some time, we need only assume that contingent things possibly fail to exist at some time. Thought this argument, it is not necessary to find the physical evidence of God’s existence as we can prove God’s existence by logic.

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